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Denise Husa

Denver paralegal Denise HusaMeet Senior Paralegal Denise Husa

While I was born in New York, I have lived in Colorado since I was a child and am proud to call Colorado my home. I have been working as a paralegal for over 15 years and appreciate that my career provides me with the ability to help people. I know how important family and other loved ones are and how crucial it is to protect them and your legacy to them. Luckily, I find my career extremely rewarding, since when you consider today’s economy and my future travel habit (see below ), I will almost certainly never retire.  

I consider myself very fortunate to be a part of this phenomenal firm, which is not only the best second family I could have ever imagined, but that also values work life balance, and promotes time with our primary families. It affords me the ability to cheer my daughter on at all of her sporting events. In my free time, I love nothing more than to relax with my daughter or enjoy one of the many hiking trails that Colorado has to offer. I hope to do more traveling outside of Colorado later in life when my little sidekick is old enough to fly solo.

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Call our Colorado and Colorado estate planning attorney at (303) 713-9147 or fill out the contact form on this website to schedule a no-cost, no-obligation consultation.

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Common Probate Questions

What is probate in Colorado?

Probate in Colorado is the legal process by which a deceased person’s assets are distributed and their debts are paid under court supervision.

When is probate necessary in Colorado?

Probate is typically required when a person dies with assets solely in their name, and those assets exceed a certain value, or there’s any real estate. The threshold amount changes over time, so checking the current limits is essential.

How do I start the probate process in Colorado?

To initiate probate in Colorado, you need to determine if formal probate is required, and then file an Application or a Petition (as well as the necessary ancillary documents) with the appropriate court, depending on the circumstances.

What assets are subject to probate in Colorado?

Generally, assets that are solely owned by the deceased, such as real estate, bank accounts, and personal property, are subject to probate. Jointly owned assets with rights of survivorship, assets held in a trust, and assets with designated beneficiaries typically bypass probate.

How long does the probate process take in Colorado?

The duration of probate in Colorado can vary depending on the complexity of the estate and any disputes that may arise. Often it takes a year or more to complete.

What are the costs associated with probate in Colorado?

Probate costs in Colorado can include court fees, attorney fees, personal representative fees, and other administrative expenses. These costs can vary based on the size and complexity of the estate.

Can I avoid probate in Colorado?

Yes, there are strategies to avoid probate in Colorado, such as creating a revocable living trust, using beneficiary designations on assets like life insurance policies and retirement accounts, and jointly owning property with rights of survivorship.

What are the rights and responsibilities of a personal representative in Colorado?

The personal representative (executor or administrator) is responsible for managing the estate, paying certain debts and taxes, and distributing assets to beneficiaries in accordance with the law and the deceased person’s will (if one exists).

How are disputes handled in Colorado probate cases?

Disputes in Colorado probate cases can be resolved through mediation, negotiation, or litigation in court if necessary. Common disputes may involve the validity of the will, claims by creditors, or disagreements among beneficiaries.

Is estate tax a concern in Colorado probate?

Colorado does not have a state-level estate tax, but federal estate tax may apply to larger estates. It’s important to consider federal tax implications when dealing with an estate.

Is estate tax a concern in Colorado probate?

Colorado does not have a state-level estate tax, but federal estate tax may apply to larger estates. It’s important to consider federal tax implications when dealing with an estate.
 It’s essential to consult with an attorney or legal professional experienced in Colorado probate law to get accurate and up-to-date information and guidance on your probate matter.

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