Justin W. Blow

Denver paralegal Denise HusaMeet Owner Justin Blow

Meet Justin W. Blow, the owner of Colorado Estate Matters, which he founded in January 2022. He dissolved his previous practice, Phillips & Blow, PC., with the goal of creating a firm that values integrity, excellence, compassion, and acceptance. Justin envisioned a law firm that treats all clients and staff with respect, free from any form of discrimination based on religion, politics, or socio-economic status. 

Justin brings extensive experience to the table, having worked as a criminal trial lawyer, probate litigation attorney, and estate planner. He defended clients facing charges ranging from misdemeanors to murder and handled all aspects of Will and Trust disputes. Justin’s vast courtroom experience and legal acumen benefit his clients, and now he focuses on Estate Planning, Elder Law, Probate, and Guardianship/Conservatorship law.

Before becoming a Denver estate planning attorney and probate lawyer, Justin worked as an investigator in the areas of Fraud Prevention, Criminal Defense, and Death-penalty Mitigation. His experience as an investigator enables him to locate witnesses and evidence that others may have missed, giving his clients an edge. Justin knows where to find relevant facts when the government or the opposition fails to provide them.

Justin earned his Juris Doctorate from the University of Denver’s Sturm College of Law and his Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy and Psychology from Florida State University. He’s licensed to practice law in Colorado and Florida, as well as the U.S. District Courts for Colorado and the Middle and Northern Districts of Florida.

 When Justin is not assisting clients with their estate needs, he enjoys sailing, hiking, Jeeping, camping, and floating with his wife and son all over the United States, and recently, jumping out of perfectly good aircraft.

Justin’s areas of practice include

Estate Planning

Probate & Estate Administration

Will and Trust Litigation.

Call Colorado Estate Matters, Ltd. for a Free Consultation

Call our Colorado and Colorado estate planning attorney at (303) 713-9147 or fill out the contact form on this website to schedule a no-cost, no-obligation consultation.

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Common Probate Questions

What is probate in Colorado?
Probate in Colorado is the legal process by which a deceased person’s assets are distributed and their debts are paid under court supervision.
When is probate necessary in Colorado?
Probate is typically required when a person dies with assets solely in their name, and those assets exceed a certain value, or there’s any real estate. The threshold amount changes over time, so checking the current limits is essential.
How do I start the probate process in Colorado?
To initiate probate in Colorado, you need to determine if formal probate is required, and then file an Application or a Petition (as well as the necessary ancillary documents) with the appropriate court, depending on the circumstances.
What assets are subject to probate in Colorado?
Generally, assets that are solely owned by the deceased, such as real estate, bank accounts, and personal property, are subject to probate. Jointly owned assets with rights of survivorship, assets held in a trust, and assets with designated beneficiaries typically bypass probate.
How long does the probate process take in Colorado?
The duration of probate in Colorado can vary depending on the complexity of the estate and any disputes that may arise. Often it takes a year or more to complete.
What are the costs associated with probate in Colorado?
Probate costs in Colorado can include court fees, attorney fees, personal representative fees, and other administrative expenses. These costs can vary based on the size and complexity of the estate.
Can I avoid probate in Colorado?
Yes, there are strategies to avoid probate in Colorado, such as creating a revocable living trust, using beneficiary designations on assets like life insurance policies and retirement accounts, and jointly owning property with rights of survivorship.
What are the rights and responsibilities of a personal representative in Colorado?
The personal representative (executor or administrator) is responsible for managing the estate, paying certain debts and taxes, and distributing assets to beneficiaries in accordance with the law and the deceased person’s will (if one exists).
How are disputes handled in Colorado probate cases?
Disputes in Colorado probate cases can be resolved through mediation, negotiation, or litigation in court if necessary. Common disputes may involve the validity of the will, claims by creditors, or disagreements among beneficiaries.
Is estate tax a concern in Colorado probate?

Colorado does not have a state-level estate tax, but federal estate tax may apply to larger estates. It’s important to consider federal tax implications when dealing with an estate.

Is estate tax a concern in Colorado probate?

Colorado does not have a state-level estate tax, but federal estate tax may apply to larger estates. It’s important to consider federal tax implications when dealing with an estate.
 It’s essential to consult with an attorney or legal professional experienced in Colorado probate law to get accurate and up-to-date information and guidance on your probate matter.

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